Technical Details of Ancient Stone Work

1). According to Andrey Sklyrov:

“and this one of them looks like in a close-up. The depth of this cut is about 1 cm, about 2/5th of an inch at times maybe more. Basically, this is a V-shaped cut with a width of about 3-4mm or about 3/20th of an inch, on entry at the top and practically zero width at the bottom. It’s about 1/10th of a millimeter, maybe 1/250th of an inch. Not a single one of our modern materials which we use for cutting can withstand the load exerted upon it given a similar circumstance of working with granite-like this. In other words, we can’t even imagine what this tool could have been made out of. Here we have the same grooves but a bit further down. The width of the cutting blade was about 1 to 2/10ths of a millimeter or about 1/250th of an inch. For a comparison, the blade on a modern disk saw can’t be wider than 1cm or about 2/5th of an inch”

2). According to Christopher Dunn:

 

“Plate 12 (left and below). Modern tools against ancient surfaces reveal a level of precision that should not exist. “

“The artifacts I have measured in Egypt have the marks of careful and remarkable manufacturing methods. They are unmistakable and irrefutable in their precision, but origin or intent will always be open to speculation. The accompanying photograph was taken inside the Serapeum on August 27, 2001. Those taken of me inside one of these huge boxes show me inspecting the squareness between a twenty-seven-ton lid and the inside surface of the granite box on which it sits. The precision square I am using was calibrated to .00005 inch (that is, 5/100,000 of an inch) using a Jones & Lamson comparitor. The underside of the lid and the inside wall of the box are incredibly square. Finding that the squareness was achieved not just on one side of the box but on both raises the level of difficulty in accomplishing this feat.” “Think of this as a geometric reality. In order for the lid to be perfectly square with the two inside walls, the inside walls would have to be perfectly parallel. Moreover, the topside of the box would need to establish a plane that is square to the sides. That makes finishing the inside exponentially more difficult. The manufacturers of these boxes in the Serapeum not only created inside surfaces that were flat when measured vertically and horizontally, but they also made sure that the surfaces they were creating were square and parallel to each other, with one surface, the top, having sides that are five feet and ten feet apart from each other. But without such parallelism and squareness of the top surface, the squareness noted on both sides would not exist.”

“As an engineer and craftsman who has worked in manufacturing for more than forty years and who has created precision artifacts in our modern world, in my opinion this accomplishment in prehistory is nothing short of amazing. Nobody does this kind of work unless there is a very high purpose for the artifact. Even the concept of this kind of precision does not occur to an artisan unless there is no other means of accomplishing what the artifact is intended to do. The only other reason that such precision would be created in an object is that the tools that are used to create it are so precise that they are incapable of producing anything less than precision. With either scenario, we are looking at a higher civilization in prehistory than what is currently accepted. The implications are staggering.”

“This is why I believe that these artifacts that I have measured in Egypt are the smoking gun that proves, without a shadow of a doubt, that a higher civilization existed in ancient Egypt than what we have been taught. The evidence is cut into the stone.”

“The boxes that are off the beaten tourist’s path in the rock tunnels of the Serapeum would be extremely difficult to produce today. Their smooth, flat surfaces, orthogonal perfection, and incredibly small inside corner radii that I have inspected with modern precision straightedges, squares, and radius gauges leave me in awe. Even though after contacting four precision granite manufacturers I could not find one who could replicate their perfection, I would not say that it would be impossible to make one today—if we had a good reason to do so.”

“But what would that reason be? For what purpose would we quarry an eighty-ton block of granite, hollow its inside, and proceed to craft it to such a high level of accuracy? Why would we find it necessary to craft the top surface of this box so that a lid with an equally flat underside surface would sit square with the inside walls? There may be arguments against the claims of advanced societies in prehistory. Some may argue that the lack of machinery refutes such claims, but a lack of evidence is not evidence. It is fallacious to deny or ignore what exists by arguing for what does not exist. When we ponder the purpose for creating such precision, we inexorably move beyond the simple reasons espoused by historians and are forced to consider that there was a civilization in prehistory that was far more advanced and vastly different from what was previously thought. We do not need to look for secret chambers or halls of records to know that this civilization existed. It is crafted into some of the hardiest materials with which they worked—igneous rock.”

Source: Forbidden History: Prehistoric Technologies, Extraterrestrial Intervention, and the Suppressed Origins of Civilization (p. 254-255)

ii). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZFN29FdCM0 – Precision! – Evidence for Ancient High Technology

3). Technical Details of the Hedjet as per Christopher Dunn:

To accomplish such cutting today in one of the hardest natural materials known and with such a high order of precision would require specialized equipment and careful planning.” What tools did the ancient Egyptian artists and engineers possess?”

“The side view of the Hedjet revealed that the contour on the front was also a true radius. Interestingly, though, at this angle, the radius had reduced in size by about 15 percent. (See figure 1.11; Radius B is 85 percent of Radius A.) Moreover, as the radius transitioned from the side to the front, the center point of the radius moved down slightly.”

“Fortunately, there were other crowns to study, and I set up my camera to focus on another on the west side of the hall—one of three crowns that had been placed in front of three statues positioned between the columns. In taking the series of photographs shown in figure 1.12, I attached a compass to the tripod and moved the camera around the crown in 45 degree increments. When I analyzed the results in the computer, I was astounded at the amazing accomplishment of these ancient craftsmen and, more important, of the fact that they saw fit to design these crowns to incorporate such a difficult and complicated work of art and engineering. From a conceptual and design standpoint, designing the crowns in this way would be a fairly straightforward task, but did the designer have any idea what he was asking of the craftsperson who would cut his design into stone? He might have said to his friends, “Hey want to see what I did to drive the guys in the shop crazy? I just made the design of the crown exponentially more difficult to manufacture.”

“To accomplish such cutting today in one of the hardest natural materials known and with such a high order of precision would require specialized equipment and careful planning. What tools did the ancient Egyptian artists and engineers possess? Were the tools they used as sophisticated as the products they created? What I discovered was not the product of a simple mind. The crowns are sophisticated products with difficult and exact surfaces that would challenge any craftsman, even one who is trained in today’s methods and equipped with today’s tools.”

“Most people will never actually create objects to a high precision. It is understandable, therefore, that most people overlook this important aspect of a civilization’s infrastructure. To laypeople, precision is an abstract concept. This is not a criticism. If you have not had precision manufacturing experience, either professionally or as a hobby, an understanding of the concept of precision is academic.” 

Source Forbidden History: Prehistoric Technologies, Extraterrestrial Intervention, and the Suppressed Origins of Civilization (p. 251).

“There is support for such a speculation if we look at artifacts purely from an engineering perspective. It has been said that to understand the ancient Egyptian culture, you have to think like an Egyptian. To understand its technological accomplishments, however, you have to think like an engineer.” –  Christopher Dunn is making a logical statement here. The way an Egyptologist looks at a structure & a skilled Engineer look at a structure is not the same. This is why Christopher Dunn is able to point out & discuss the precision of these structures since Christopher Dunn’s job involved in precision engineering. We know that this is because our background affects how we see the world. For instance, when I started analyzing the automatic writing phenomenon, I closely analyzed data to see if I could find application-specific parameters since the phenomenon was showing a connection to UFOs; to surprise me application-specific parameters were all over in the literature on spiritualism. 

Source: Forbidden History: Prehistoric Technologies, Extraterrestrial Intervention, and the Suppressed Origins of Civilization (pp. 252-253)

“When fixing a Cartesian view to a crown that approximates the crown’s orientation on the Ramses head, we see that its contours are not simple lathed shapes, but instead, they change continuously by degrees while conforming to a shape that, when measured at any angle around the object, is a true radius or combination of blended radii that form an ellipsoid. The sweeping curved surface was not the result of a random burst of artistic whimsy and a flourish with the chisel. It was a decidedly disciplined, orderly application of a design with tools that have not yet been found in the archeological record, but which were built to achieve the precise removal of material.”

“The design and precise geometry that was crafted into Ramses’ crown is a symbol of a society that was disciplined in precision engineering and craft. The pieces could not have been created without the aid of some kind of mechanical device that guided the tool along a prescribed contour. Neither was this mechanical device a simple machine.”

Source: Lost Technologies of Ancient Egypt Advanced Engineering in the Temples of the Pharaohs – (p.36/37)

4). The Geometry of Ramses II Statues at Memphis:

"Plate 7. Ramses at Memphis provides further evidence of uncompromising precision with ancient three-dimensional profiling."
Source of the images: Lost Technologies of Ancient Egypt Advanced Engineering in the Temples of the Pharaohs
Source of the images: Lost Technologies of Ancient Egypt Advanced Engineering in the Temples of the Pharaohs

“When I further investigated the symmetry of the jawline, I drew a line to bisect the head midway between the jaw. The photograph was expanded to five times the size of a human head, and then I made measurements using the measurement tool in CAD using 2 decimal point precision in inches. Figure 3.9 confirms that the geometry of the Ramesseum Ramses is more precise than that of the head outside the Luxor Museum.”

Source: Source: Lost Technologies of Ancient Egypt Advanced Engineering in the Temples of the Pharaohs – (p.76)

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